1. "Inside of me lives a civil war between me and me. It is amazing, because I am all the time winning and all the time losing."
    Bshayer F.R   (via skeezd)
  2. unnecessarycombatroll:

    The next time a reporter asks an actress ‘what she did to fit into her costume’ i want her to look at him like he’s a bit dim and say slowly, "Well…it’s my costume. It was made in my size. I was cast as that character, so they gave me a costume that would fit.” while looking a little embarrassed for him. And then go on to answer the deep character interpretation questions he obviously meant to ask. Obviously.

  3. artsytoad:

Yoshitaka Amano, Forest of Spirits

    artsytoad:

    Yoshitaka Amano, Forest of Spirits

  4. xtremecaffeine:

    bootses:

    missvoltairine:

    "Don’t take ~chemicals~ like prozac, I heard you can get the same effect by eating 19 oranges a day, that’s only 570 oranges a month!!!"

    "Yeah I know you have horrible panic attacks but like, have you tried yoga?"

    "Yeah I understand depression completely stops you from doing everyday tasks AND that you then feel guilty about that… But you have to just power through it and get on with things as normal!"

  5. "You don’t have to choose between your sexual side, your intellectual side, your emotional side, or your spiritual side…. Just combine them all into one powerful expression and shine that brilliant light all across this world and beyond."
  6. stem-cell:

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

    stem-cell:

    rosalarian:

    pourquoi-nutmeg:

    nortonism:

    The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

    YES.

    Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

    “You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

  7. cowabunnga:

This is a representation of a healthy relationship; equally nourishing one another and allowing each lovers mind to blossom freely all the while being supportive and naturally developing similar flowering thoughts and beliefs along the way. 

    cowabunnga:

    This is a representation of a healthy relationship; equally nourishing one another and allowing each lovers mind to blossom freely all the while being supportive and naturally developing similar flowering thoughts and beliefs along the way. 

  8. faerypotter:

    afairyheart:

    I LOVE LOVE LOVE Brian Froud’s work!  One of my favorite Artists!

    See that little guy in the lower left corner of the top painting? The creature with the flute and the pine cone hat? He is tattooed on my shoulder blade. You’ll note that the piper doesn’t have any legs in the painting, so the tattoo artist made his bottom half just kind of go all wispy. It’s cool and I love it. I had the opportunity to show it to Brian at a faery festival. He looked at it and said, “He doesn’t have any legs, so you have to dance for him.” And that is the story of one more time the Froud family changed my outlook on my life. 

  9. Justin R. Christenbery
    metacognition

  10. Justin R. Christenbery
    metacognition